Blogging in the enterprise: Tips for Success

Melanie Turek provides some good tips on blogging: Blogging in the Enterprise: Tips for Success. There are still many organizations that are not taking advantage of blogs behind the firewall.

In the increasingly virtual workplace, it’s important for employees to make virtual connections—and blogs are one way to help them do that.

In the enterprise, there are two ways to use blogs. One is a corporate-supported (and approved) blog that’s meant to be read by the outside world; the other is an internal blog for employees’ eyes only, for sharing information and creating job and interest-related connections. (There are also lots of blogs out there penned by individuals who use the space to discuss their companies and the markets they are in, among other interests, but these are not technically “enterprise blogs,” as they are not established or supported by the companies themselves.)

Frankly, I don’t see a lot of either type of enterprise blog being used today, and I rarely talk to people who have even considered an internal version. But I think that’s actually the type that has the most promise for the enterprise.

Internal blogs can provide tremendous benefits if developed and supported by the culture change that is necessary: 

Internally-focused blogs are easier to maintain and serve a more relevant purpose. Companies with large numbers of remote or virtual employees can use enterprise blogs to keep those staffers connected to the company and one another. By setting up a variety of blogs tagged to specific topics, companies allow employees to share ideas for new products, IT fixes and best practices, better business processes, strong customer service.

Are you taking advantage of blogging in your organization?

  1 comment for “Blogging in the enterprise: Tips for Success

  1. January 2, 2007 at 11:45 am

    I definitely take advantage of it at work. I’ve actually made knowledge connections and friendships via the company blogosphere that I would have never made before. I also believe that I can keep up with new tools and processes much better via these connections. But I tend to be an active experimenter and I seek out information? What about those people who don’t do this naturally? Should we be encouraging this more with employees.

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